Autoimmune Paleo Raw "Oreo" Bites

Note from Amanda: Today I am thrilled to bring you a guest recipe by Angela at Paleo Kitchen Lab. If you don't already follow her blog, you need to! She is incredibly creative with her recipes, and this one is no exception! You are really going to love this recipe for Paleo Oreos. With just a few simple ingredients you can make this delicious, kid-friendly, autoimmune paleo treat in a snap! Please join me in extending Angela a very warm welcome, and I hope you enjoy this recipe! I can't wait to make it myself. And if you don't already follow Angela, be sure to check her out on PinterestFacebook, & Instagram

Autoimmune Paleo Raw "Oreo" Bites //

Don’t expect these to taste like actual Oreos. They are named after the famous sandwich cookies due to the slight resemblance, but these gems are made from only 4 whole-food ingredients with no sugar added.

Don’t worry, they’re still sweet thanks to the natural sugars in the ingredients. My only complaint is how small they are and how fast you can eat them.  The solution is to double or triple the recipe below.

This is a great treat for anyone on the autoimmune Paleo diet because no chocolate is used. Chocolate color and texture comes from carob, which unlike chocolate, is sweet rather than bitter.

Besides being healthy and satisfying, these ‘unoreos’ also get high scores for cuteness. And they’re fun and easy to make with kids.  The hardest part is waiting for them to chill and harden in the fridge before you can eat them. Enjoy!

Raw Paleo Oreos

Recipe by Angela Privin @ Paleo Kitchen Lab

Try these Raw Paleo Oreos, perfect for the autoimmune protocol!

Yield: 12 - 15 "unoreo" bites, depending on how thickly you slice them

I've linked to products from trusted affiliate partners for the ingredients used in this recipe. I only recommend products that I use myself and believe you will love, too!



  1. Melt the coconut oil in a pan and mix in carob powder, mixing well until the lumps are gone. Add the optional vanilla and cinnamon.
  2. Peel and slice the refrigerated bananas.
  3. Use a toothpick or skewer to dip the chilled banana into the warm coconut carob oil and place on parchment paper. If this seems way too time-consuming you can lay the banana slices out on the parchment-line cookie sheet and carefully pour the carob oil over it. Using a cup with a pour spout will help pour the carob mixture directly over each banana slice and reduce the mess. The easier method will save time but may not produce treats that look as pretty.
  4. Put the carob-covered bananas in the fridge for 30 minutes or until they’ve hardened. Take them out and spread a little bit of coconut cream on one slice and sandwich another banana slice on top if it. That’s it! You’re done.
  5. Note: If coconut cream is hard to get you can try to use regular coconut milk as the cream typically congeals at the top or bottom of the can (especially if you put the can in the fridge). Drain the water to use the cream. You can buy coconut cream online here.

Angela Privin conducts grain-free experiments in her kitchen and shares the results on her blog Paleo Kitchen Lab. Close to a decade ago, Angela used the Paleo diet to heal a severe case of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. She’s been symptom free ever since. Angela is thankful that IBS forced her to learn to cook, as it’s been very useful and rewarding. Angela enjoys studying chi gong, starting fermentation projects and playing with small dogs.

You can also find Angela on Pinterest, Facebook and Instagram.

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